safe driving - 2/5 - Spencer Insurance Agency, Inc

Tools for the Parents of Teen Drivers – Lesson 2

Picking up the keys

Lesson 2

(No shopping cart races)

Start this lesson with a review of Lesson 1 and summarizing the skills you will be teaching today.  The emphasis of this lesson should be on vehicle control and stopping the vehicle.

While driving it is important to be aware of where all the vehicles are on the road.  In order to monitor the other vehicles on the road, a driver must effectively utilize his/her mirrors.  This would be a good time to demonstrate the blind spot.  While the auto is parked, stand in the blind spot to help your teen adjust the side mirrors.  They will not realize until you physically show them this spot is real!  Note:  the side mirrors need to be adjusted out, you should only see a TRACE of the side of the auto.  The KEY is what is next to the auto and outwards.  The teen needs to KNOW all autos are different; some vehicles have larger blind spots than others.

Safety Tip:  Apply the small convex mirrors to both side mirrors. These mirrors increase the view TREMENDOUSLY!

                      

One of the top 5 mistakes teens make is following too closely.  They do not realize the distance it takes to stop a vehicle.  Once your teen is feeling a little more comfortable behind the wheel, have them simulate an emergency stop.

Safety Tip:  Walk off the distance it takes to stop the vehicle from various speeds.  Try using the marked white lines or bring a few cones to mark the distance. This process will help your teen realize just how long it takes to stop the car.  Stress how the distance will increase at highway speeds.

 

Most vehicles on the road today are equipped with the ABS (Anti-Locking Brake Systems) safety feature.  Try to engage this safety feature today.  Depending on the size of the parking lot you are using, this may be difficult to do.  However, it is important for your teen to experience this safety feature in a controlled environment for the first time.

Lesson # 2

(Parking Lot)

Orientation

(15 Minutes)

Grade

(A, B, C)

Comments, Praise   and

Areas of   Improvement

Review   Previous Lesson

Safety   Check

Discuss   Today’s Lesson

Driving Experience

( 1 Hour)

Grade

(A, B, C)

Comments, Praise   and

Areas of   Improvement

 

 

Review   Starting

Review   Stopping

Review   Turning  Introduce   New Skill:  Scanning the Road

Scan   Forward

Scan   Side to Side

Blind   Spot

Use   of Mirrors  Introduce   New Skill:

Backing

Backing   Straight

Turning   While Backing

Review

(15 Minutes)

 

Comments, Praise   and

Areas of   Improvement

Scanning   the Road (Anticipating Problems)

 

Backing

Good   Points

 

Additional Comments:

Skills to review for next lesson:


Tools for the Parents of Teen Drivers – Lesson #1

Picking up the keys

Lesson #1

(Letting Go is hard to do!)

Safety Tip:  MAP or visually locate the POLES and other FIXED obstacles in the parking lot.  Locate pedestrians, bikers and boarders. DO not forget, you might be sharing the parking lot.

Start slowly by taking your teen to a deserted school or church parking lot.   The first day should be conducted under ideal driving conditions.  Find a place with wide open space and no traffic.  Limit their speed to no more than 15 mph.

Make sure your teen is comfortable accelerating, braking and turning.  The object of this lesson is for them to become comfortable behind the wheel and feel in control of the vehicle before driving on a public road.  It is imperative that you correct any improper use of technique before a habit can be formed.

This is a learning experience for your teen as well as for you, as an instructor.  Determine your teens’ skill level and observe how your teen learns.  One of the most common mistakes you can make as an instructor is to assume your teen is familiar with driving or the operation of the vehicle.

Safety Tip:  Driving instruction is NOT just while the teen drives. YOU should be engaging the teen driver while you drive (even the pre-teen).

Start the lesson with you acting as the instructor and end the lesson with your teen acting as the instructor.  One of the best ways to learn a subject is to teach the subject.  By reversing roles, your teen will be demonstrating their full comprehension of the lesson.

This lesson may need to be repeated several times before both of you are comfortable venturing onto a public road.   There is no need to rush this phase of the process.  Make sure your teen is comfortable behind the wheel before moving on to the next set of skills.

   Safety Tip:  Use games to teach your teen about driving.  For example:

  1. Spot the loser – Identify the worst driver on the road.  Have your teen explain the errors the driver is making.
  2. Count the errors – See how many errors you can see other drivers make.
  3. Predict the move – try to predict the next move of the other vehicles on the road.

Your teen is and HAS BEEN thinking driving is easy. They do NOT know all the decisions you make as you drive down the road.  Don’t just tell them; tell them WHILE you are processing the decisions.

 

Lesson #1

(Parking Lot)

Orientation

(15 Minutes)

Grade

(A, B, C)

Comments, Praise and

Areas of Improvement

 

Vehicle Safety Check

   
 

Adjust Seat & Mirrors

   
Review Vehicle Controls & Gauges    

Driving Experience

( 1 Hour)

Grade

(A, B, C)

Comments, Praise and

Areas of Improvement

 

Starting the Engine

   
Engaging the Transmission    
 

Use of Mirrors

   
 

Moving Forward

   
 

Acceleration

   
 

Braking

   
 

Stopping Distance

   
 

Turning

   
 

Orientation on the Road

   

Review

(15 Minutes)

 

Comments, Praise and

Areas of Improvement

 

Stopping Distances

   
 

Orientation on the Road

   
Scanning the Road (Anticipating Problems)    
 

Good Points

   

 

Additional Comments:

 

Skills to review for next lesson:


Tuesday’s Teen Driver Tip: What car should you buy or give to your teen driver?

Picking up the keys

In case you’re planning to buy your teen a car for Christmas this year, or you’re
trying to decide which of your existing cars might be the best one for her to drive,
recognize that the car that provides the greatest amount of safety should be your
first choice.

To determine which vehicles avoid and withstand crashes best rely on the Top
Safety Picks from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).  This nonprofit
organization, which is funded by auto insurers, tests and rates the safety of vehicles
based on their performance during several critical tests.

Now the IIHS is not the organization that provides the safety rating on a car’s
window sticker where you also see fuel ratings, list of features and price.  Those
ratings are provided by a federal agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA).  So you can’t rely on that data to determine which cars
earned the Top Safety Pick and Top Safety Pick + rating which was introduced
in 2013 to recognize models with the best crash protection.  Go here to get a
complete list of the 2013 Top Safety Picks  and Top Safety Picks + winners by
type/size.

If you’re looking for a 2014 model, those safety picks will be announced in December;
so watch for updates.  See Officer Poer’s article below for more details on what it
takes to achieve these designations.

Thank you for doing everything you can to promote teen driver safety.

Wishing you safe and happy holidays!

Charlie

PS Please feel free to call our office at 215-885-2200 to get more information on how to teach your teen to be a safe driver.

Tools for the Parents of Teen Drivers

Picking up the keys

Teen Driver Education is so important.  However information on teaching teen driver safety is hard to find.

Parents are required to complete at least 65 hours of behind-the-wheel skill-building, including no less than ten hours of nighttime driving and five hours of bad weather driving, before taking your road test.  Click here for “A Guide to Obtaining a Pennsylvania Junior Learner’s Permit and Junior Driver’s License.”

 Let Spencer Insurance Agency help you with the content for teaching your teen to drive. Spencer Insurance has a Free “Safe Teen Driver Guide” that provides 16 hour long lessons.  Each lesson provides a topic and suggestions for a discussion with your teen driver.  Each lesson is designed to cover one hour of the 65 hours needed.

Spencer Insurance also provides parents of teen drivers the opportunity to get a monthly email newsletter with tips devoted to teen driver education and safety.

If you would like to receive our “Safe Teen Driver Guide” or our monthly email newsletter email us as info@spencerinsurance.com or call us at 215-885-2200.

 

Comment on this blog and let us know how useful you find these tools.  Let us know what tools you use to teach teen driver safety.

Tuesday’s Tip for Parents of Teen Drivers

Picking up the keys

It is important for the parents of teen drivers to have an ongoing discussion with their teenage driver about the importance of teen driver safety. Coming up with strategies to assist your teen driver is a big task.  However, we can help you.

We have several tools for you to help with teen driver safety and teen driver education. One of our best is the “Teenager-Parent Driving Contract” and the “Family Driving Rules & Consequences.”  Both of these documents are related to each other.

Driving is a privilege not a right.  This should be drilled into your teen driver.  This is State law and should also be the law in your household.  You can take the keys away from your teen driver if necessary.

By reviewing the Teenager-Parent Driving Contract and the Family Driving Rules & Consequences both you and your teen will have an understanding of their responsibilities when driving and the consequences should they not follow the rules.

Get a copy of these documents from our website or call us at 215-885-2200  and we will be glad to send you a copy.  Feel free to edit and make changes to these documents so they fit your household.

The least that is accomplished through this process is that you and your teen driver will have no questions about the consequences of unsafe driving.  There will be no surprises when consequences are handed out.  Hopefully, the process will have your teen driver review safe driving tips that could help avoid a costly accident and protect your child. Call us to find out other ways we can assist you when discussing Teen Driver Safety.

Share with ideas you used while training your teen driver.  Comment below.

Tuesday’s Tip for Parents of Teen Drivers

Picking up the keys

Okay, let’s get it out in the open.

Having a new teen driver in the house can be nerve racking.  Hopefully we can provide you some tools to make this life event less stressful for both you and your teen driver. Check out our website , designed for the parents of teen drivers,  for tools like the Teen Driver contract and Teen driving laws.

However the topic I want to discuss today is how you can avoid paying outrageous insurance rates and protect your family’s future from a lawsuit.

My report “Spencer’s Tips: 7 Costly Mistakes Parents Make when Buying Insurance for Teen Drivers” highlights 7 traps parents fall into when getting insurance for their teen driver.  For the full report visit my website.

Let’s talk about the top 3 mistakes.

Mistake # 3:  Not taking advantage of your good credit rating.

Insurance companies have been using credit scoring for some time now.  They know that clients with good credit ratings generally will have fewer claims. Many parents have built up a good credit rating over time.   Your teenager driving a car has not had the time or possibly the opportunity to build up a good credit rating.  As independent agents we can look at our companies and see which ones are the best fit for your family. It may be best for you teen driver to be on your policy to get the best credit score.

Mistake # 2: Lower Liability Limits to Save Money.

Teen drivers are 5 times more likely to get into an accident.  Why is it then that parents think this is the time to lower liability coverage.  This could be devastating to your family’s finances. Let us discuss other ways to bring down the cost of your car insurance.  This may be the time to raise your liability limits and consider an umbrella policy.

Mistake #1: Using an insurance company employee as an agent

Don’t trust your hard earned dollars with someone who works directly for one insurance company. Their loyalty rests with the person signing their paycheck.  Use an independent insurance agent that represents several companies.  An independent agent can help you choose the company that is the best fit for your situation.  It may even mean having two car insurance policies.

Check out the other 4 mistakes parents of teen drivers make most often.  Then give us a call today at 215-885-2200 to review your situation and provide you more tips for teen driver safety.

Help your local Home and School Association, PTA or PTO win $500 and win $250 for yourself

school-busWin $500 . . .

for your favorite PTO, PTA or Home and School Association!

Do you want an extra $250 to help with your Holiday Shopping? Everyone who votes gets a chance for a $250 Gift Card!

Vote for your favorite Parent/Teacher Association (PTA), Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) or Home and School Association (H&SA) and help them win $500.

enter_now_carlyOr go to our Contest Page

Spencer Insurance Agency will donate $500 to the PTA, PTO or H&SA that receives the most votes.  All those who vote will have a chance to win a $250 Gift Card.  Spread the word to your friends and family to vote for their favorite Home and School Association. Share this contest with your PTO, PTA or H&SA members. Spencer Insurance Agency believes that parent support of our schools is a key to their success and wants to show their support by rewarding an active PTO, PTA, or H&SA.

Rules: By voting, you agree to the following rules:

  1. Contest period starts October 25, 2013 and ends December 6, 2013.
  2. Your PTO, PTA or H&SA must be located in Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Delaware.
  3. The PTO, PTA or H&SA that receives the most votes during the contest period will receive $500.
  4. You can only vote one time.
  5. Each person who votes will have their name entered into a drawing for a $250 Gift Card.
  6. Winning organization and the  winner of the $250 Gift card agree to have their photo taken with  employees of Spencer Insurance Agency and used in Spencer Insurance Agency’s Marketing.
  7. All decisions made by Spencer  Insurance are final.

Good Luck!
ps_lisaSpread the word to your friends by sharing this post.

NHTSA unveils “5 to Drive” Teen Safety Campaign

This is Teen Driver Safety Week.  The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) unveiled a new campaign that challenges parents to discuss five critical driving practices with their teenage drivers that can have the greatest beneficial impacts in the event of a crash.

The “5 to Drive” campaign encourages parents to visit here and discuss with their teens
one safety topic each day during national teen driver safety week. The “5 to Drive” campaign topics are:

  1. No      cell phone use or texting while driving,
  2. No      extra passengers,
  3. No      speeding,
  4. No      alcohol, and
  5. No      driving or riding without a seat belt.

The objective of the campaign is to counteract poor driving decisions that have contributed to the high death rate among teen drivers.  Visit their website to help you start the discussion with your teen drivers.  Their life could depend on it!

Remember, our teens learn by our example.  Make sure you are setting a good example by following these 5 topics yourself.

For more tips for the parents of teen drivers go to our website and click     teen-driver                    .

Tips for Parents of Teen Driver

This week is Teen Driver Safety Week.  Here are some tips for Parents of Teen drivers.

Here is some great advice form Flaura Winston, MD, PhD about why Postitive Reinforcement from parents if far more effective than scare tactics in teaching teens to drive.  Listen to her from National Public Radio’s Morning Edition.

Check out our website and click theteen-driver for more tips for the parents of teen drivers. Get information on Teen Driver Safety, Teen Driver News and Tips for parents of teen drivers.

 

 

Pa Mature Driver Course can save you 5% on your auto insurance

Save money on your car insurance premium.  If you are a Pennsylvania driver 55 or older then you can qualify for a 5% savings on your auto insurance premium by taking a state approved Mature Driver Course.

After you complete the course, send your insurance agent a copy of your completion certificate.  This is good for three years.  After 3 years you can take a refresher course so you can continue the discount for another 3 years.

Find a course near you:

 

  •    AARP logo                     Contact AARP for a class near you.  Call 888-227-7669 or write AARP at AARP-Pennsylvania 30 North 3rd Street, Suite 750 Harrisburg PA 17101

 

  • Contact Seniors For Safe Driving at 800-559-4880

 

  • aaa logoContact your local office.  AAA has an  online course available

 

Contact us when you finish the course.  Your discount will become effective on your next renewal and last 3 years.

Comment here if you took the course.  Also let us know where you took the course.

 

 

 

 

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